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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
does. >> in arizona, unlike other states, while there are protections based on rarks religion -- race, religion, national origin, there's none on sexual orientation. so already a business can say, "i don't serve gays", this is deflated. does it grant protection for gays or businesses to go ahead and discriminate. i think what it has done is shined the light on the fact that arizona is a state that does not offer protection for gays. folks rallied around that saying "why not?" >> how has it hurt the state? >> arizona had a history of problems, whether it's pr problems or not. after the governor of arizona cancelled a holiday for reverent mart mart martin luther king, a lot pulled out. if it does not change the laws, it underscores the question of does arizona think of itself as a friendly state. does it see itself as a place welcoming to everyone. for a company like apple. apple decided to build a plant here with 1200 employees. they are a gay-friendly company. they may think "do we want to located a plant where some. our employees may not feel welcome" >> what does it say about the st
fall simply along religious lines. i think there are a range of factors, politics, religion, economics and ideas about gender and sectixuality that impact ho people are safe or not. >> a quick thought: is there any effort at, say, embargos or sanctions against countries like uganda that have initiated these very tough laws? >> this is an incredibly controversial issue. there is a lot of debate about this. the uganda and lgbt movement is in heavy debate. civil society activists called for foreign governments to review their policies on foreign aid to uganda. they didn't call for foreign governments to withdraw aid. and this is a very important distinction that i hope hear. >> said, some governments have already made decisions about how the anti-homosexuality bill and now law will affect their aid to uganda and the government of denmark was one of the first to change its policies saying its hundreds of millions of dollars a year will no longer be given to the ugandan government, but it will be distributed among civil society in uganda. >> jessica sturn, thanks. >> thank you. >>> after t
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana lieblson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having any. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
foundation and eddie glaude, a professor of religion and african american studies at princeton university. welcome, gail christopher and eddie glauchlted i want to start which gail christopher, because the kellogg foundation has a lot of money invested in this project. why is it essential what is important about it? >> when we look at the disparities that our young men of color face in terms of opportunity and access to opportunity in this country, it does not bode well for the future of the nation. young people of color make up about 23% of the population between ages 10 and 17. yet they make up over 50% of those who are incarcerated in the juvenile and sometimes criminal justice system. they are disproportionately suspended and expelled from school. the data is clear that there are underlying factors that are limited opportunities for this population group. and these underlying factors need to be addressed. >> why are the solutions in the hands of the private secter? >> they really aren't. the solutions are also in the public sector. but they aren't really focused in a specific way arou
. there is always some kind of aspect of religion. christianity has a big part of the story. at the same time, you have extended family. a lot of the western world has gone quite nuclear in terms of family interactions whereas we are quite extended. that story helps people. tell me about how the films are to the rest of africa. appeal, do they cross borders? >> absolutely. they will have some kind of viewing going on. the fact that you can actually sell the stuff, that is on the streets of like nairobi or johannesburg. it is anenglish, african english which is like an americanized english as well. it is something that does travel very very far. the stories are largely of africa it's. hollywood or bali wood has done this with the audiences. tell.ives a stories to >> in terms of where people watch, is not actually mostly in nigeria. it is in places with slightly better connections. thehis is the bigs of moment which is the fragile ecosystem or infrastructure on the ground in africa. were example, our largest markets in the u.s., canada, the u.k.. we have more people in london watching than in the wh
blooded murder. british government said this was nothing to do with religion or faith. of course the jury in the court agreed. it took them just an hour and a half, 90 minutes to sentence these men to convicted these men and for the four men of the jury to say they were guilty. >> sentencing has been delayed over life tariffs. can you explain what these are? >> the life terms, life is the mandatory sentence for murder, so these men will get life, but life in the u.k. does not always mean life, it comes with a caveat in a lot of cases. it could be with a minimum term of 20, 30, 40 years, therefore a killer could potentially be released in the future. this is the kind of case where you have members of the public, newspapers saying throw away the key, they should never be builds. the trial judge said when these men were convicted, he was delaying sentencing, waiting for a key court case which we all knew was coming, it happened last week here, the court of appeals judges ruled that some killers can be sentenced without question to life behind bars, their entire life, they will never, ever be
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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